Tag Archives: Jessica Henwick

‘Love and Monsters’ is frightfully fun

AT A GLANCE

Love and Monsters

Critical rating: 3½ stars out of 4

Directed by: Michael Matthews (“Five Fingers for Marseilles”)

Starring: Dylan O’Brien, Jessica Henwick, Michael Rooker, Dan Ewing, and Ariana Greenblatt

Rated: PG-13

Available Oct. 16: Releasing via Premium Video-On-Demand and as a digital purchase on most platforms, including Apple TV, Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, Microsoft Movies & TV, Sony PlayStation Video and FandangoNOW

Once upon a time, “Love and Monsters” was slated for big-screen release under the title “Monster Problems,” but a variety of factors resulted in its move to premium video with a new name.  Honestly, “Love and Monsters” is the better title because the movie is both a quirky adolescent actioner and a sweet romantic fable. 

The focus is on Joel Dawson (Dylan O’Brien), a sweet kid who is separated from his high school girlfriend, Aimee (Jessica Henwick), by the Monsterpocalypse, a cataclysmic event prompted by a meteor on a collision course with Earth. In an effort to avoid the Armageddon, mankind launches a massive nuclear strike, which works great until the fallout floats down from space, turning every cold-blooded creature into horrifying, oversized predators. Without warning, toads and cockroaches are elevated from scurrying pests to alpha predators, and what’s left of humanity is forced into underground colonies.  

Life on the surface is dangerous and frightening thanks to the massive pests that like nothing better than to snack on human interlopers. Because of that, trips above ground are short-lived, limited in scope and attempted only when absolutely necessary. Although Joel’s colony periodically sends people out for food and supplies, he is relegated to the bunker since he has a reputation for freezing at the most inopportune moments. It’s not a reputation he likes, but it is deserved. 

After years of hapless searching, Joel miraculously locates Aimee using his colony’s radio system. He happily discovers that she is only 80 miles away, but 80 miles might as well be the moon considering the dangers of the outside world. Nevertheless, Joel decides that his love for Aimee is worth dying for, so he packs a bag and heads above ground, determined to make it to his long-lost girl. 

This is a decidedly romantic proposition, and the love Joel has for Aimee is less dysfunctional than that driving most young adult love stories. But … “Love and Monsters” is more than romance. The bulk of the story is about Joel coming to terms with the tragedy that brought him to this point while learning that he has more to offer than anyone – including himself – is aware.  

His journey brings him in contact with a rugged survivalist name Clyde (Michael Rooker) and his young charge, Minnow (Ariana Greenblatt). The two take Joel beneath their wings and teach him valuable survival skills, which immediately come in handy. 

“Love and Monster” has a heart, but it certainly doesn’t shortchange the audience on the monster front. Joel and company face off against a variety of creatures who are beautifully rendered and truly frightening. Director Michael Matthews walks the fine line between whimsy and horror, presenting a movie that oozes both attitude and fun. 

O’Brien, best known as the lead from the “Maze Runner” franchise, is a solid leading man capable of comedy and drama. He’s called on to deliver both throughout the film, and the result is pleasant. Rooker, Greenblatt, Henwick and the remainder of the cast are also capable. Only Joel’s character is developed beyond a surface level and, while it might have been fun to get a deeper look at the others, this isn’t a problem. 

“Love and Monsters” may not become a classic, but it is a truly good time. It’s scary enough to work as a Halloween film, romantic and funny enough to transcend the horror genre and written with both an edge and wit. Writers Brian Duffield and Matthew Robinson deserve significant credit because – while genre-crossing films are sought after – they don’t always work. “Love and Monsters” not only works, it does so exceptionally well.  

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